Scrapbook Layout Inspiration for Valentine’s Day

When it comes to scrapbooking Valentine’s Day, there are several topics you can choose from. You may want to make a page to remember a special Valentine’s date, a page about someone you love, or a child’s Valentine’s Day party at school. Perhaps you could tell a story about how you and your special Valentine met, or create a page about a favorite romantic spot or memory.

Check out these creative scrapbook layouts full of inspiration for scrapbooking your Valentine’s Day photos. I like that the first layout uses a dark gray color as the primary color for a layout about her son while another layout uses black as its primary color for a layout about a Valentine’s Day date. This use of non-traditional colors made the layouts stand out to me and proves that you aren’t limited to red and pink for your February layouts.

Links to layouts:

  1. Layout by Leanne Allinson at jotmagazine.com
  2. Layout by luckyme at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  3. Layout by Biancka at Scrapbook.com
  4. Layout by CarolinaScrapper at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  5. Layout by kristalund at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  6. Layout by kristalund at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  7. Layout by Mendi Yoshikawa at Scrapbook.com
  8. Layout by tkradtke at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  9. Layout by Sheana at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  10. Layout by kendrawalter at the-lilypad.com
  11. Layout by tracermajig at designerdigitals.com
  12. Layout by Amy L at designerdigitals.com

Scrapbook Layout Inspiration for Valentine’s Day

When it comes to scrapbooking Valentine’s Day, there are several topics you can choose from. You may want to make a page to remember a special Valentine’s date, a page about someone you love, or a child’s Valentine’s Day party at school. Perhaps you could tell a story about how you and your special Valentine met, or create a page about a favorite romantic spot or memory.

Check out these creative scrapbook layouts full of inspiration for scrapbooking your Valentine’s Day photos. I like that the first layout uses a dark gray color as the primary color for a layout about her son while another layout uses black as its primary color for a layout about a Valentine’s Day date. This use of non-traditional colors made the layouts stand out to me and proves that you aren’t limited to red and pink for your February layouts.

Links to layouts:

  1. Layout by Leanne Allinson at jotmagazine.com
  2. Layout by luckyme at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  3. Layout by Biancka at Scrapbook.com
  4. Layout by CarolinaScrapper at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  5. Layout by kristalund at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  6. Layout by kristalund at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  7. Layout by Mendi Yoshikawa at Scrapbook.com
  8. Layout by tkradtke at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  9. Layout by Sheana at Sweet Shoppe Designs
  10. Layout by kendrawalter at the-lilypad.com
  11. Layout by tracermajig at designerdigitals.com
  12. Layout by Amy L at designerdigitals.com

How to save a PDF to Google Drive from a browser using an iPhone or an iPad

I am beginning the process of organizing my homeschool curriculum and online resources for my three children. It is quite the job, let me tell you! Even though I consider myself to be quite “techie,” I have many of my resources saved only on my computer right now. But my eldest child is now in middle school and we find ourselves needing to share documents regularly, such as her homework assignments or the latest chapter in the Minecraft fan fiction story she is writing using Google Docs.

One way I am starting to move things online is to start saving our homeschool resources we’ve collected over the years to Google Drive. This way, my daughter and I can both access and update them from any device at any time.

We use a lot of Apple products (Macbooks, iPads, and iPhones.) I was having a hard time finding tutorials on how to save a PDF to Google drive from an iPad or iPhone when the PDF is open in the device’s browser. After playing around with it, I discovered it was quite simple, really; you just need to know where to look!

Pre-requisites:

  • You must have the Google Drive app (free) installed on your ios device.
  • You will need to have a Google account and should have it already setup (by logging in) on the Google Drive app on your device. (Note: the app typically does not log you out, so you do not need to open it and login every time. Once you have logged in, it remembers your login credentials unless you remove them.)

Safari is the default browser installed on ios systems, so unless you have downloaded and regularly use a different browser app on your device, chances are good that when you open a PDF on your device that you are viewing it in Safari. I will also include directions for Google Chrome, too, since that is my favorite browser and the one I use. (Step 3 is the only step that has a slight variation amongst the two browsers.)

How to save a PDF from the Safari or Chrome browser to Google Drive

  1. Open the PDF in your Safari or Google Chrome browser on your ios device.
  2. Tap anywhere on the PDF form (but not on a link if it has hyperlinks included) to get to the PDF save options.
  3. If using Safari, an option for “More” will appear at the top of the PDF. Tap “More” to receive a list of options for your PDF form and select “Drive.” If using Google Chrome, an option for “Open in” will appear at the bottom right corner of the PDF. Tap “Open in” and select “Drive.” 
    Safari:      
    Chrome:  

    • Note: If Drive is not an option listed in your row of available apps, scroll through the options to the right until you see an option for “More.” Select “More” and you will be given a list of activities that you can add to your default scroll list of apps for the future. Make sure Drive is turned on.
             
    • You can use the icon with the three lines (by dragging and dropping) to reorder how the activities appear in your default list.
    • Select “Done.”
  4. Select the “Drive” icon. 
      • You can rename the PDF by tapping on the PDF name.
      • You can select which Google Drive account to save it to (if you have more than one) by tapping on the email address field.
      • You can select which folder the PDF will be saved to by selecting the “My Drive” option and then selecting the individual folder within your Drive and selecting “Save Here.”
      • You can also designate sharing options for the PDF.

  5. Select Upload. The PDF will now be saved to the designated folder in your Google Drive account.

Printable/Downloadable Copy – How to Save a PDF from the ios (iPad, iPhone) browser to the Google Drive App.

How to save a PDF to Google Drive from a browser using an iPhone or an iPad

I am beginning the process of organizing my homeschool curriculum and online resources for my three children. It is quite the job, let me tell you! Even though I consider myself to be quite “techie,” I have many of my resources saved only on my computer right now. But my eldest child is now in middle school and we find ourselves needing to share documents regularly, such as her homework assignments or the latest chapter in the Minecraft fan fiction story she is writing using Google Docs.

One way I am starting to move things online is to start saving our homeschool resources we’ve collected over the years to Google Drive. This way, my daughter and I can both access and update them from any device at any time.

We use a lot of Apple products (Macbooks, iPads, and iPhones.) I was having a hard time finding tutorials on how to save a PDF to Google drive from an iPad or iPhone when the PDF is open in the device’s browser. After playing around with it, I discovered it was quite simple, really; you just need to know where to look!

Pre-requisites:

  • You must have the Google Drive app (free) installed on your ios device.
  • You will need to have a Google account and should have it already setup (by logging in) on the Google Drive app on your device. (Note: the app typically does not log you out, so you do not need to open it and login every time. Once you have logged in, it remembers your login credentials unless you remove them.)

Safari is the default browser installed on ios systems, so unless you have downloaded and regularly use a different browser app on your device, chances are good that when you open a PDF on your device that you are viewing it in Safari. I will also include directions for Google Chrome, too, since that is my favorite browser and the one I use. (Step 3 is the only step that has a slight variation amongst the two browsers.)

How to save a PDF from the Safari or Chrome browser to Google Drive

  1. Open the PDF in your Safari or Google Chrome browser on your ios device.
  2. Tap anywhere on the PDF form (but not on a link if it has hyperlinks included) to get to the PDF save options.
  3. If using Safari, an option for “More” will appear at the top of the PDF. Tap “More” to receive a list of options for your PDF form and select “Drive.” If using Google Chrome, an option for “Open in” will appear at the bottom right corner of the PDF. Tap “Open in” and select “Drive.” 
    Safari:      
    Chrome:  

    • Note: If Drive is not an option listed in your row of available apps, scroll through the options to the right until you see an option for “More.” Select “More” and you will be given a list of activities that you can add to your default scroll list of apps for the future. Make sure Drive is turned on.
             
    • You can use the icon with the three lines (by dragging and dropping) to reorder how the activities appear in your default list.
    • Select “Done.”
  4. Select the “Drive” icon. 
      • You can rename the PDF by tapping on the PDF name.
      • You can select which Google Drive account to save it to (if you have more than one) by tapping on the email address field.
      • You can select which folder the PDF will be saved to by selecting the “My Drive” option and then selecting the individual folder within your Drive and selecting “Save Here.”
      • You can also designate sharing options for the PDF.

  5. Select Upload. The PDF will now be saved to the designated folder in your Google Drive account.

Printable/Downloadable Copy – How to Save a PDF from the ios (iPad, iPhone) browser to the Google Drive App.

July Multi-Photo Scrapbook Challenge

Hello, scrapbooking friends! I am on a summer break from my college courses right now so I’ve had some time to actually scrapbook – Yay!

As a result, I have a new template that I would like to share with you as another “Multi-Photo Scrapbook Page” challenge. Anyone who participates will receive this new digital scrapbook template for free.

Rules:
1) Create a NEW scrapbook layout that contains 4 or more photos on one page. Using a template is okay!
2) Upload the layout to my Facebook page @ No Reimer Reason’s Digital Scrapbooking Templates. I will PM, via Facebook, a link for you to download your free template. (Please give me a few days after uploading to send you the template.)

(Note: If anyone is interested in an 8.5×11 template version instead of the 12×12, let me know and I’ll whip one up! 😉 )

No Reimer Reason - Template 86

I hope your summer is going well. I appreciate you all and enjoy seeing your creative layouts.

July Multi-Photo Scrapbook Challenge

Hello, scrapbooking friends! I am on a summer break from my college courses right now so I’ve had some time to actually scrapbook – Yay!

As a result, I have a new template that I would like to share with you as another “Multi-Photo Scrapbook Page” challenge. Anyone who participates will receive this new digital scrapbook template for free.

Rules:
1) Create a NEW scrapbook layout that contains 4 or more photos on one page. Using a template is okay!
2) Upload the layout to my Facebook page @ No Reimer Reason’s Digital Scrapbooking Templates. I will PM, via Facebook, a link for you to download your free template. (Please give me a few days after uploading to send you the template.)

(Note: If anyone is interested in an 8.5×11 template version instead of the 12×12, let me know and I’ll whip one up! 😉 )

No Reimer Reason - Template 86

I hope your summer is going well. I appreciate you all and enjoy seeing your creative layouts.

July Multi-Photo Scrapbook Challenge

Hello, scrapbooking friends! I am on a summer break from my college courses right now so I’ve had some time to actually scrapbook – Yay!

As a result, I have a new template that I would like to share with you as another “Multi-Photo Scrapbook Page” challenge. Anyone who participates will receive this new digital scrapbook template for free.

Rules:
1) Create a NEW scrapbook layout that contains 4 or more photos on one page. Using a template is okay!
2) Upload the layout to my Facebook page @ No Reimer Reason’s Digital Scrapbooking Templates. I will PM, via Facebook, a link for you to download your free template. (Please give me a few days after uploading to send you the template.)

(Note: If anyone is interested in an 8.5×11 template version instead of the 12×12, let me know and I’ll whip one up! 😉 )

No Reimer Reason - Template 86

I hope your summer is going well. I appreciate you all and enjoy seeing your creative layouts.

Music in Your Homeschool

Music is an important part of our family. My husband plays several instruments and is in a garage band (he was in a band when we met, too, so of course I couldn’t resist developing a crush), I sing and was a part of a musical group in college, my mother-in-law teaches piano and composes, and my dad sings and is in a barbershop quartet. One of my favorite things to do on a date with my husband is attend concerts. Music is important to us and so naturally, we want to pass our passion for music on to our children.

Not only will all three of our girls (eventually) learn an instrument, but I also want to develop in them an appreciation for different kinds of music.

One resource we have been using in our homeschool this year is The Story of the Orchestra.

Brief Description

The Story of the Orchestra is a hardcover book that guides you through each instrument typically found in an orchestra, along with a CD that contains samples of each instrument to listen to. The book also teaches about famous composers and musicians from different eras (Romantic, Modern, etc), along with a musical sample of one of their compositions.

How We Use It In Our Homeschool

One day a week, I read 1-2 pages (depending on the topic) to my daughters. We then listen to the music sample included on the CD. Often, we also search Youtube to find a video of a live orchestra playing the full song. Many of the songs are LONG (20 minutes or more) so we’ll let it play in the background as we continue on with our day. One way to draw in my little girls, ages 6 and 3, is I will search for the song in a cartoon. For instance, many of the old Looney Tunes and Disney cartoons relied on a lot of orchestral music as the background music for their cartoons. What a fun way to introduce orchestral and classical music to children without them even realizing it! And even if you are unsure if they are picking up the music, they ARE. My girls often will recognize a song that they’ve heard before, even if they cannot remember the composer of the song. I still call that a win!

Sample Pages

There are pages about specific instruments, such as the cello. These contain historical information along with fun facts. If you look at the image below, you will also see (in the orange oval) directions on which track to play, along with things to listen for in the song and/or more information about the song.

Story of the Orchestra - Cello

There are also pages specific to composers. These contain facts about the composer, their musical style, and their compositions. (Did you know that there was almost a riot during one of Stravinsky’s concerts? Just one of many fun pieces of trivia throughout the book.)

Story of the Orchestra - Igor Stravinsky

My 11yo daughter was inspired by what she learned about this particular composer, Igor Stravinsky. She likes to compose her own songs on the piano already, and after reading (and listening) to Stravinsky’s unique style of dissonance, I later heard her at the piano experimenting with some dissonant chords. Score! (pun not intended)

How do you incorporate music in your homeschool? (Seriously, I will need some ideas for next year!)

*No Reimer Reason is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. I did not receive any free items for this post and the opinions are my own.

Music in Your Homeschool

Music is an important part of our family. My husband plays several instruments and is in a garage band (he was in a band when we met, too, so of course I couldn’t resist developing a crush), I sing and was a part of a musical group in college, my mother-in-law teaches piano and composes, and my dad sings and is in a barbershop quartet. One of my favorite things to do on a date with my husband is attend concerts. Music is important to us and so naturally, we want to pass our passion for music on to our children.

Not only will all three of our girls (eventually) learn an instrument, but I also want to develop in them an appreciation for different kinds of music.

One resource we have been using in our homeschool this year is The Story of the Orchestra.

Brief Description

The Story of the Orchestra is a hardcover book that guides you through each instrument typically found in an orchestra, along with a CD that contains samples of each instrument to listen to. The book also teaches about famous composers and musicians from different eras (Romantic, Modern, etc), along with a musical sample of one of their compositions.

How We Use It In Our Homeschool

One day a week, I read 1-2 pages (depending on the topic) to my daughters. We then listen to the music sample included on the CD. Often, we also search Youtube to find a video of a live orchestra playing the full song. Many of the songs are LONG (20 minutes or more) so we’ll let it play in the background as we continue on with our day. One way to draw in my little girls, ages 6 and 3, is I will search for the song in a cartoon. For instance, many of the old Looney Tunes and Disney cartoons relied on a lot of orchestral music as the background music for their cartoons. What a fun way to introduce orchestral and classical music to children without them even realizing it! And even if you are unsure if they are picking up the music, they ARE. My girls often will recognize a song that they’ve heard before, even if they cannot remember the composer of the song. I still call that a win!

Sample Pages

There are pages about specific instruments, such as the cello. These contain historical information along with fun facts. If you look at the image below, you will also see (in the orange oval) directions on which track to play, along with things to listen for in the song and/or more information about the song.

Story of the Orchestra - Cello

There are also pages specific to composers. These contain facts about the composer, their musical style, and their compositions. (Did you know that there was almost a riot during one of Stravinsky’s concerts? Just one of many fun pieces of trivia throughout the book.)

Story of the Orchestra - Igor Stravinsky

My 11yo daughter was inspired by what she learned about this particular composer, Igor Stravinsky. She likes to compose her own songs on the piano already, and after reading (and listening) to Stravinsky’s unique style of dissonance, I later heard her at the piano experimenting with some dissonant chords. Score! (pun not intended)

How do you incorporate music in your homeschool? (Seriously, I will need some ideas for next year!)

*No Reimer Reason is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. I did not receive any free items for this post and the opinions are my own.

Music in Your Homeschool

Music is an important part of our family. My husband plays several instruments and is in a garage band (he was in a band when we met, too, so of course I couldn’t resist developing a crush), I sing and was a part of a musical group in college, my mother-in-law teaches piano and composes, and my dad sings and is in a barbershop quartet. One of my favorite things to do on a date with my husband is attend concerts. Music is important to us and so naturally, we want to pass our passion for music on to our children.

Not only will all three of our girls (eventually) learn an instrument, but I also want to develop in them an appreciation for different kinds of music.

One resource we have been using in our homeschool this year is The Story of the Orchestra.

Brief Description

The Story of the Orchestra is a hardcover book that guides you through each instrument typically found in an orchestra, along with a CD that contains samples of each instrument to listen to. The book also teaches about famous composers and musicians from different eras (Romantic, Modern, etc), along with a musical sample of one of their compositions.

How We Use It In Our Homeschool

One day a week, I read 1-2 pages (depending on the topic) to my daughters. We then listen to the music sample included on the CD. Often, we also search Youtube to find a video of a live orchestra playing the full song. Many of the songs are LONG (20 minutes or more) so we’ll let it play in the background as we continue on with our day. One way to draw in my little girls, ages 6 and 3, is I will search for the song in a cartoon. For instance, many of the old Looney Tunes and Disney cartoons relied on a lot of orchestral music as the background music for their cartoons. What a fun way to introduce orchestral and classical music to children without them even realizing it! And even if you are unsure if they are picking up the music, they ARE. My girls often will recognize a song that they’ve heard before, even if they cannot remember the composer of the song. I still call that a win!

Sample Pages

There are pages about specific instruments, such as the cello. These contain historical information along with fun facts. If you look at the image below, you will also see (in the orange oval) directions on which track to play, along with things to listen for in the song and/or more information about the song.

Story of the Orchestra - Cello

There are also pages specific to composers. These contain facts about the composer, their musical style, and their compositions. (Did you know that there was almost a riot during one of Stravinsky’s concerts? Just one of many fun pieces of trivia throughout the book.)

Story of the Orchestra - Igor Stravinsky

My 11yo daughter was inspired by what she learned about this particular composer, Igor Stravinsky. She likes to compose her own songs on the piano already, and after reading (and listening) to Stravinsky’s unique style of dissonance, I later heard her at the piano experimenting with some dissonant chords. Score! (pun not intended)

How do you incorporate music in your homeschool? (Seriously, I will need some ideas for next year!)

*No Reimer Reason is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. I did not receive any free items for this post and the opinions are my own.

Music in Your Homeschool

Music is an important part of our family. My husband plays several instruments and is in a garage band (he was in a band when we met, too, so of course I couldn’t resist developing a crush), I sing and was a part of a musical group in college, my mother-in-law teaches piano and composes, and my dad sings and is in a barbershop quartet. One of my favorite things to do on a date with my husband is attend concerts. Music is important to us and so naturally, we want to pass our passion for music on to our children.

Not only will all three of our girls (eventually) learn an instrument, but I also want to develop in them an appreciation for different kinds of music.

One resource we have been using in our homeschool this year is The Story of the Orchestra.

Brief Description

The Story of the Orchestra is a hardcover book that guides you through each instrument typically found in an orchestra, along with a CD that contains samples of each instrument to listen to. The book also teaches about famous composers and musicians from different eras (Romantic, Modern, etc), along with a musical sample of one of their compositions.

How We Use It In Our Homeschool

One day a week, I read 1-2 pages (depending on the topic) to my daughters. We then listen to the music sample included on the CD. Often, we also search Youtube to find a video of a live orchestra playing the full song. Many of the songs are LONG (20 minutes or more) so we’ll let it play in the background as we continue on with our day. One way to draw in my little girls, ages 6 and 3, is I will search for the song in a cartoon. For instance, many of the old Looney Tunes and Disney cartoons relied on a lot of orchestral music as the background music for their cartoons. What a fun way to introduce orchestral and classical music to children without them even realizing it! And even if you are unsure if they are picking up the music, they ARE. My girls often will recognize a song that they’ve heard before, even if they cannot remember the composer of the song. I still call that a win!

Sample Pages

There are pages about specific instruments, such as the cello. These contain historical information along with fun facts. If you look at the image below, you will also see (in the orange oval) directions on which track to play, along with things to listen for in the song and/or more information about the song.

Story of the Orchestra - Cello

There are also pages specific to composers. These contain facts about the composer, their musical style, and their compositions. (Did you know that there was almost a riot during one of Stravinsky’s concerts? Just one of many fun pieces of trivia throughout the book.)

Story of the Orchestra - Igor Stravinsky

My 11yo daughter was inspired by what she learned about this particular composer, Igor Stravinsky. She likes to compose her own songs on the piano already, and after reading (and listening) to Stravinsky’s unique style of dissonance, I later heard her at the piano experimenting with some dissonant chords. Score! (pun not intended)

How do you incorporate music in your homeschool? (Seriously, I will need some ideas for next year!)

*No Reimer Reason is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. I did not receive any free items for this post and the opinions are my own.

Music in Your Homeschool

Music is an important part of our family. My husband plays several instruments and is in a garage band (he was in a band when we met, too, so of course I couldn’t resist developing a crush), I sing and was a part of a musical group in college, my mother-in-law teaches piano and composes, and my dad sings and is in a barbershop quartet. One of my favorite things to do on a date with my husband is attend concerts. Music is important to us and so naturally, we want to pass our passion for music on to our children.

Not only will all three of our girls (eventually) learn an instrument, but I also want to develop in them an appreciation for different kinds of music.

One resource we have been using in our homeschool this year is The Story of the Orchestra.

Brief Description

The Story of the Orchestra is a hardcover book that guides you through each instrument typically found in an orchestra, along with a CD that contains samples of each instrument to listen to. The book also teaches about famous composers and musicians from different eras (Romantic, Modern, etc), along with a musical sample of one of their compositions.

How We Use It In Our Homeschool

One day a week, I read 1-2 pages (depending on the topic) to my daughters. We then listen to the music sample included on the CD. Often, we also search Youtube to find a video of a live orchestra playing the full song. Many of the songs are LONG (20 minutes or more) so we’ll let it play in the background as we continue on with our day. One way to draw in my little girls, ages 6 and 3, is I will search for the song in a cartoon. For instance, many of the old Looney Tunes and Disney cartoons relied on a lot of orchestral music as the background music for their cartoons. What a fun way to introduce orchestral and classical music to children without them even realizing it! And even if you are unsure if they are picking up the music, they ARE. My girls often will recognize a song that they’ve heard before, even if they cannot remember the composer of the song. I still call that a win!

Sample Pages

There are pages about specific instruments, such as the cello. These contain historical information along with fun facts. If you look at the image below, you will also see (in the orange oval) directions on which track to play, along with things to listen for in the song and/or more information about the song.

Story of the Orchestra - Cello

There are also pages specific to composers. These contain facts about the composer, their musical style, and their compositions. (Did you know that there was almost a riot during one of Stravinsky’s concerts? Just one of many fun pieces of trivia throughout the book.)

Story of the Orchestra - Igor Stravinsky

My 11yo daughter was inspired by what she learned about this particular composer, Igor Stravinsky. She likes to compose her own songs on the piano already, and after reading (and listening) to Stravinsky’s unique style of dissonance, I later heard her at the piano experimenting with some dissonant chords. Score! (pun not intended)

How do you incorporate music in your homeschool? (Seriously, I will need some ideas for next year!)

*No Reimer Reason is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. I did not receive any free items for this post and the opinions are my own.

Valentines Day Scrapbook Paper

With Valentine’s Day coming up, I thought it was time to pull these Valentine’s Day / Love themed papers back out of the old archives and give them a little reboot. These were part of the Sweetheart kits I created back in 2009 and they have been in retirement for the past few years. They are now residing in my Etsy Store. 🙂 Happy Valentine’s Day!
Valentine's Day / Love / Sweetheart Digital Scrapbook Papers

Valentines Day Scrapbook Paper

With Valentine’s Day coming up, I thought it was time to pull these Valentine’s Day / Love themed papers back out of the old archives and give them a little reboot. These were part of the Sweetheart kits I created back in 2009 and they have been in retirement for the past few years. They are now residing in my Etsy Store. 🙂 Happy Valentine’s Day!
Valentine's Day / Love / Sweetheart Digital Scrapbook Papers

Multi-Photo Scrapbook Challenge

Back when I was designing regularly, I used to host a “Multi-Photo Scrapbook Page” challenge at my then-host’s site. It was a lot of fun for me and I’ve missed it.

So now that the holidays are past us, I am sure you have a lot of photos to get scrapped! I would like to have a little challenge here on this blog and on my Facebook Page. Anyone who participates will receive this new two-page digital scrapbook template for free!
No Reimer Reason - Template 84

Rules:
1) Create a NEW scrapbook layout that contains 4 or more photos on one page. Using a template is okay!
2) Upload a link to your layout to this page OR to my No Reimer Reason – Digital Scrapbooking by February 10, 2016. I will email or Facebook PM a link for you to download your free template by February 13th.

(Note: If anyone is interested in an 8.5×11 template version instead of the 12×12, let me know.)

Happy New Year and Happy Scrapbooking!